Kissito Partner Laura Stachel Finalist For CNN Hero of the Year

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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • In some countries, a lack of reliable electricity is to blame for deaths during childbirth
  • Dr. Laura Stachel witnessed this tragic truth during a trip to Nigeria five years ago
  • She and her husband are now delivering a solution: solar energy in a suitcase
  • Who will be Hero of the Year? Cast your vote here or through your mobile device
  • Vote up to November 17th one time a day

Road to recovery; every child matters

 UPDATE 9/3: After having severe stomach pain Brian was taken to the hospital again. It was found that he has an obstruction in his lower stomach that may have been caused by the poison. They were initially going to do surgery, but he started progressing, so they opted to see if he will get better without it first.  He will be in the hospital until at least Thursday. If he has made enough progress he will be discharged by the end of the week; if he is is unable to eat whole foods he will have to get surgery to remove the obstruction. 

You can help support Brian by donating at kissitointernational.org/donate.aspx and typing Brian in the Special Instructions box. All of the donations will go to his hospital bills and, hopefully soon, his school fees as well. 

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Sitting on the couch, drinking a mango juice box, Brian is completely engulfed in the  cartoon show on the TV. No one knows for sure, but it might be the first time he has ever watched a television show and although he can’t understand most of the English words he seems to enjoy the characters – laughing when they laugh, staring with longing when they seem sad.  He speaks Luguiso, like the majority of children from the eastern Uganda region, though since he’s been at the KHI compound, he hasn’t spoke much at all.  He understands most hand gestures, and will respond with a nod of his head when you rub your tummy like you’re hungry, or pretend to tilt a cup up to your mouth.  He seems happy enough, although his true feelings remain a mystery for now. One thing is certain though, and that is the fact that he probably never imagined he would be where he is now, when less than a month ago he was on the brink of death.

***

It was a Saturday afternoon and Carolina Tovar, a KHI volunteer was working at the Bugobero health center when the police came in with a little boy. He was 11, but was so frail and malnourished, that at first glance he didn’t seem any older than 6. They said a boda driver had found him lying in the middle of the road, and took him to the police station a few miles away. When the police started asking the boy questions he was so sick he could barely talk. He told them that he was sure his mother had poisoned him. She gave him a mendazi, a staple breakfast food, and told him to stay put; she was going to the Kenyan border and would be back in a couple of hours – it had been days since then.

Brian in the hospital, about a week after he was found.

Brian in the hospital, about a week after he was found.

Often times if a father leaves his family, the mother cannot support the children on her own. When she meets a new man it’s a possibility that he will want his own children with her. Although, not acceptable in any culture, it is not uncommon to hear about a mother abandoning her children when tempted with the promise of a better life. Brian is one of those unfathomable statistics.

Christine, the head nurse at the hospital had been walking through the villages trying to find his home or even a distant relative that would be able to take care of him, or at the very least sign paperwork for him. She came back empty handed; not a single person knew who Brian’s family was.

A man from the church in the village, Mufumbo Alex, had never met Brian but decided to care for him while he was in the hospital. Weeks later you could still find him next to the bed.  He did not have a dollar to his name, nor a roof to sleep under; not a thing to offer Brian but company and love. He gave it unconditionally though, and that seemed to be enough.

***

The staff at Bugobero was able to stabalize him, but after about 24 hours they decided he would need an ultrasound. In order to get one he would need to take the two hour drive to the regional referral hospital. Carolina decided she could not let him stay there alone, and the KHI team decided together that we would bring him to the private hospital to make sure he had the best care, and if needed we would pay for the cost ourselves.

He spent two weeks in the hospital, and after numerous test and x-rays it was decided that he would need surgery in order for his stomach to heal. He was so brave the entire time, braver than any 11 year old should ever have to be.

Day by day you could see the strength come back into his body. Slowly but surely he was beginning to look like a happy young adult. He was able to sit up, and then walk on his own. Kissito volunteers were bringing him porridge at first, but is wasn’t long before he was able to eat rice and beans and chicken.

Before we knew it, it was time for him to be discharged…

… and go home.

***

We sat around the living room one night taking about the options for him when he left the hospital. He could stay at Bugobero for a while, but no kid (or adult even) would want to live at the hospital. He could sit at the police station until they find an orphanage for him, but he could be there for weeks or months, with no promise of food or his medicine. It didn’t take long before we realized what he had to do. When you have a house with empty rooms, and extra food every night, how could we not let him stay there?

So that’s exactly how it happened, and he’s been here almost two weeks now. He is still malnourished, and has a number of health problems, but he gets stronger every day. He is still a ways away from recovery, but is growing stronger every day.

Brian, about 2 weeks after being discharged from the hospital.

Brian, about 2 weeks after being discharged from the hospital.

We hope to find a family member, or someone in the village that knows him and will take him in for good. If not we will eventually find an orphanage that is good enough to provide for him; not just food and shelter, but education, guidance and compassion.

As much as we want him to, we know he can’t stay forever. It will be just as hard to let him go as it was to see him for the first time.  As hard as it’s going to be though, it will be worth it, knowing we changed his story, and saved his life.

***

We may not be able to save the world, but as the quote goes “Whoever saves one life saves the world entire,” and because of the compassion of Mufunbo Alex, the staff at the hospital, and the KHI team – Brian has the entire world ahead of him.

To stay up to date with Brians recovery visit us on Facebook and Twitter. Or, if you want to sponsor Brian, you can donate directly to him by simply typing Brian in the Special Interest box. All of the contributions will go to his hospital bills and his integration back into a normal life.

Doctors dedicated to sustainable change

In the operating room at the local regional hospital Dr. Judy and Dr. Mark Gustafson worked side by side, on a mother who had just given birth to a baby girl. Dr. Judy, an anesthesiologist and Dr. Mark, a gynecologist were in the O.R. for about two hours with the mother and child. They spoke of the story with mixed emotions.

The mother had been in labor for hours, possibly surpassing a full day. When it was finally her turn in the operating room the lack of supplies almost delayed the delivery again. Luckily, Kissito has a supply stock, and Tyler, the supply chain coordinator, was able to retrieve some of the necessary items and bring them to the hospital.

Dr. Mark Gustasfon during a c-section at Mbale Regional Referral Hospital

Dr. Mark Gustasfon during a c-section at Mbale Regional Referral Hospital

They were able to do the delivery through a caesarean section, but the baby came out with the umbilical chord wrapped around his neck, and was not breathing. The operating room only had one oxygen mask and it was needed for both the baby and mother.

Dr. Judy kind of chuckled at the level of intensity her and her husband felt during that moment in the operating room. Mark was taking care of the mother while she was taking care of the newborn.

“I need the oxygen now!”

“NO! I need it now!,”  they urgently called out to each other, trying to make sure both patients were able to breathe.

After about ten minutes the nurse looked at Judy and the baby and said “I think now we pray”. Judy did not give up though, and a few minutes later the baby finally started breathing on its own.  Even after the surgery they could hear the baby in the next room. The nurses were shocked. “Can you hear it? The baby’s crying, the baby’s crying!” they exclaimed, joyful and astonished that the child had made it.

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It was a completely different setting than the one you would find in Virginia, at the Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital where Judy practices, or the Lewis Gale Hospital where Mark is located.

In the U.S. facilities are spotless, sanitation is mandatory, medical supplies are always present, and protocols are followed with care and precision. Unfortunately, in East Africa, none of this is true.

The biggest disparity they noticed between U.S and the East African health facilities was the lack of training. Instead of intense schooling, most of the medical staff members receive on the job training.

According to Dr. Judy there are three main components that need to be addressed, in a particular order:

  • Training
  • Equipment and Supplies
  • Protocol

They are all intertwined, but the latter cannot work without the former.

Mark and Judy are being included in addressing these issues and are in the process of designing protocols and training programs for the healthcare workers.

Their first trip to Uganda only lasted two weeks, but they have already planned a return trip in April, to do more in-depth training , and to help put protocols in place!

Their education programs, along with all of the donations from their hospitals have the ability to single-handedly change a hospital, and possibly even a culture.

It’s not always easy to find doctors willing to stay in less than comfortable conditions, and work in less than practical environments. It’s even harder to find doctors willing to come back time and time again.

Drs. Judy and Mark however, are a rare gem and we are so glad to have them as part of the KHI team. Knowledge is truly the most important donation you can give, and we are incredibly grateful for their dedication to the sustainability of the education given to the people in Eastern Uganda!

To stay up to date with all of our initiatives visit us on Facebook and Twitter!

Kissito Healthcare International works with academic partners to cure pediatric diarrhea in East Africa

For immediate release: January 25th, 2012.
Contact:
Elizabeth Parsons, Director of International Projects
Tom Clarke, President & CEO

Pediatric diarrhea is one of the leading causes of death among the developing world’s children, killing approximately two million each year. The Rota virus alone is estimated to take the lives of 500,000 children annually. Kissito Healthcare International has been working with the world’s foremost expert on pediatric diarrhea, Dr. Herbert DuPont of the University of Texas-School of Public Health, to put a stop to this epidemic.

Boston University medical students did some fieldwork in Africa on behalf of Kissito where they collected samples of the stools of malnourished children. These samples were then sent to Dr. DuPont’s laboratory which revealed some unfortunate and unexpected findings; 50 of 60 some samples tested positive for E.Coli, Norovirus and Rota virus.

Dr. DuPont had been collaborating with Napo Pharmaceuticals on a drug called Crofelemer that has been shown to dramatically enhance the efficacy of Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) in certain populations. He shared his findings with them and as a result, Napo has recently entered into an agreement with the University of Texas and Kissito to conduct clinical trial interventions for Crofelemer in Manafwa District.

The work that Kissito Healthcare International is doing along with the University of Texas, Napo pharmaceuticals, Boston University, and dozens of other affiliates can possibly lead to a major breakthrough in saving the lives of children in under-developed countries, and make a significant positive impact on global health.

About Kissito Healthcare
Founded in 1989, Kissito Healthcare exists solely for the betterment and care of human life. We seek to improve patient outcomes in our domestic and global services through a balanced engagement in academics, research and health care delivery. As a charitable organization, Kissito Healthcare is funded by private and government grants and donations. In nine U.S. facilities, we provide post acute care, chronic disease self –management, long term care, assisted living, Alzheimer/dementia care, specialized respiratory care and employment to more than 800 of the country’s most dedicated and passionate healthcare providers. In our global health initiatives, we provide acute care, primary care, pediatric malnutrition programs, maternal and child health programs, and various research programs related to maternal and child health in the countries of Uganda and Ethiopia. Our global and domestic vision is to develop healthcare delivery systems that lower costs and improve outcomes for the world’s most vulnerable populations where resources are extremely limited.

Our internal culture is intensely guided by our four core values of Integrity, Passion, Excellence, and Respect.